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Alternative Latin Investor: Investing in Mexcio Issue 14

The Alternative Latin Investor Issue #14 is focusing on Investing in Mexico.  Below some of the other content of issue #14. LAWEA pronounces 2012 ‘The Year of Wind,’ we explain how investors can publicly trade private equity in Mexico, as well as an in-depth update of foreign land regulation in Brazil and Argentina.

Special Issue: Investing in Mexico

    • Finding the Value in Mexican Real Estate
    • Understanding the Mexican Mortgage
    • The  Mexican Investment Environment
    • Investment Opportunities in Business Hotels and Affordable Tourism
    • Mexico City: Car Addiction
    • Improving Mexico’s Housing Finance Infrastructure
    • Private Equity in Mexico: Capitalizing on the Growing Middle Class
    • CKDs: The Marriage of Wealth and Growth
    • Mexico’s Outlook for 2012 and Beyond
    • What We Talk About When We Talk About  Infrastructure

Renewabale Energy:  2012: LatAm’s Year of Wind Energy
Agriculture Business:Red Roses, Blue Skies: A glimpse at the LatAm flower industry
HF:  What Hedge Funds Association (HFA) members have to say about LatAm
Emerging Markets: How Will European Banks’ problems affect  Latin America
Profiles:Investing in Argentina: A legal  Perspective
Forex:Trading LatAm currencies in 2012
Real Estate

  • 40  years of residential and commercial  Development in Colombia
  • Unconstitutional regulation in Brazil
  • Argentina’s Rural Land Law

Private Equity CKD: Public Private Equity
Latin American Art
Philanthropy
Regulation: Rural Land Laws – Brazil and Argentina

Please view and access Issue 14 in the following formats

Virtual Viewer   www.alternativelatininvestor.com/issue14-sample.htm

PDF   www.alternativelatininvestor.com/issue14-sample.pdf

For more details and information please view http://www.alternativelatininvestor.com

Source: AlternativeLatinInvestor 24.02.2012

Filed under: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Energy & Environment, Latin America, Mexico, Peru, Wealth Management, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mexican Market Leaps Forward – FIX, Technology, Co-Location and Regulation

In the last 12 months dramatic changes have occurred at Mexico’s stock exchange and among its brokerage clients. Cross border partnerships, technology upgrades, new FIX infrastructure and business friendly regulatory changes have opened the Mexican market to high frequency trading (HFT).

While US regulators can be seen to scold HFT firms, the Mexican market has opened its arms. The Mexican Exchange (BMV) and its brokerage firms have upgraded their infrastructure and sought business opportunities north of the border. Earlier this year after the CME Group and the BMV signed their partnership, high frequency traders on the CME Globex trading system began to route orders to the Mexican Derivatives Exchange or MexDer. Today 90 percent of average daily volume on the MexDer comes from high frequency traders north of the border.

Mexico’s brokerage firms have completed significant infrastructure upgrades. Last spring only a few brokers in Mexico could handle a highfrequency hedge fund client and many Mexican brokers could process no more than one connection to the Bolsa Mexicana de Valores (BMV) at a time. The landscape has changed quickly and improvements in broker and exchange systems have ushered in a new capacity for speed in the transmission and execution of orders in Mexico.

Over the summer a major milestone occurred for the industry. Working with the BMV, Mexico’s brokers completed an industry-wide upgrade to FIX 4.4. The top 25 brokers are now certified with FIX 4.4 to the BMV. Leading the way, are brokerages like GBM, Interacciones, Actinver, UBS Mexico, IXE and others.

Now that Mexican brokers speak FIX 4.4, all of the order routing to the BMV can now be done through FIX allowing the BMV to retire the antiquated SETRIB protocol. The only way the BMV will allow Mexican brokers to continue to use SETRIB is by paying excessive fees, and even this will not be allowed by the end of 2011. Retiring SETRIB sets the stage for more positive changes in the industry and at the BMV.

Work is already underway to upgrade the BMV’s trade matching engine. The existing engine was built in the 1990s for a Tandem mainframe. Retiring the Tandem has many benefits. Faster order matching and processing is high on the list. In addition, more choices for application and software vendors and significant cost savings are expected. Retiring the mainframe will also eliminate the scheduling nightmares associated with the limited availability of the central mainframe for testing with the broker community. The new matching engine will be hosted on modern Unix based hardware. The release of the new matching engine and infrastructure is planned for the first quarter of 2012.

Another important milestone is the availability of a state-of-the-art co-location facility at KIO Santa Fe. The BMV infrastructure is located here and starting in October it will be easy for brokers and third party providers to collocate order routing and market data in this hosting facility leading to high throughput low latency services.

While all of the infrastructure and matching engine upgrades are momentous, they would bear no fruit without the simultaneous modernization of Mexican regulations. The initiative to modernize Mexico’s regulations, called RINO, began a year ago and phase two is due to rollout in the fall of 2011. The goal of RINO is to conform Mexican regulations to international standards. By converging with international standards, regulators hope to bring more international order flow and greater liquidity to the market, resulting in increased investment in the Mexican market.

While regulations in the US like Sarbanes Oxley and Dodd-Frank can be seen to drive businesses offshore, the regulatory changes in Mexico are removing handcuffs from businesses and facilitating opportunities. The first step forward occurred early this year with RINO I. RINO I allowed brokers to have multiple channels to the BMV’s electronic trading system. Previously all orders were in a single queue. Multiple access points per broker provides more flexibility in executing strategies and handling client requests, including separate BMV channels for program trading and orders called into the trading desk. RINO I also eliminated sizebased criteria from order management,  thus leveling the playing field in the processing of orders. RINO II takes effect on October 10, 2011, bringing more modernizations including pegged orders, improvements in crossing operations, average price operations, price delivery regardless of volume, and decimal bids for fixed income securities.

Crosses, in which a brokerage carries out a transaction through the stock exchange between two of its clients, were permitted previously but the rules were very arcane. Starting in October, the crossing operations will be vastly simplified allowing clients to simply choose whether to cross inside or outside the spread. With this modernization, the BMV hopes to repatriate orders that brokers would previously carry out in the US, where crossing orders was possible using ADRs in dark pools or at the NYSE.

In addition the RINO II regulations a very important new mid-point hidden book order. The orders execute at the midpoint, broker anonymity is guaranteed and the order priority is determined by volume. This is effectively a dark pool. Similar to Xetra, this new BMV order helps the market participants and simultaneously protects the BMV from  providers toying with moving into the Mexican marketplace.

As the regulations modernize and the FIX infrastructure hardens, opportunity beckons. Brokers are beginning to push for more high frequency trading algorithms, more efficient routing of international orders, and more sophisticated risk controls, all of which will attract even more international business. As the need for speed grows, co-location previously offered by the exchange may become more strategic, particularly to brokers wanting to attract high frequency traders.

All of this progress was made possible in large part because of the exchange’s demutualization and subsequent listing in 2008. The demutualization coincided with rule changes allowing Mexico’s pension funds or AFORES to invest. Before the rule changes, the AFORES were forced to invest almost entirely in short-term government paper. Today, Mexico’s pension funds are allowed to invest up to 25 percent, in individual stocks and shares and 12 percent in a hybrid of corporate debt and equity capital to allow companies to raise funds to expand businesses.

Considered together, regulatory improvements and infrastructure updates have morphed the BMV and the Mexican brokerage community into a thriving and modern marketplace. The BMV reported a 22 percent jump in earnings last year, with operating income increasing 70 percent in the last three months. A record six initial public offerings made it to market last year and overall trading volumes rose 50 percent in 2010. This year Mexico’s IPC index has tested and hovered near record highs.

In 2011 there are fewer IPOs, but trading volume remains strong. The order-routing agreement signed with Chicago’s CME Group has opened Mexico’s derivatives market to the world. Now, electronic trading infrastructure and investor friendly regulations have set the stage for act two.

Latin America has enjoyed a strong recovery for the most part it has sailed through the recession without lasting damage. Boosted by capital inflows, by record prices for commodity exports, by sound policies and by a heady expansion in domestic credit, the region saw economic growth of 6% last year and is on course to notch close to 5% this year. The region faces slower growth but not disaster. To up the pace, now is the time for reforms to boost productivity.

The main engines for growth in Latin America are China’s demand for minerals, food stuffs and raw materials – this looks set to continue – and consumption as tens of millions edge out of poverty and benefit from newly available credit.

Source: FIX Global Trading, 15.09.2011

Free Subscription of FIX Global Trading Magazin at http://fixglobal.com/subscription

Filed under: BMV - Mexico, FIX Connectivity, Latin America, Market Data, Mexico, News, Risk Management, Trading Technology, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

FT Special Report: Investing in Mexico

Read the FT Special Report at Investing in Mexico FT Special Report June 2011

 

Boom times despite safety fears

There has been a rise in violent crime in some areas, but the country is still a good place for business, says John Paul Rathbone

Better government and smarter leadership, combined with strategic vision, could change Mexico very swiftly, writes Luis Rubio

Regulation: Media wars give hope of more choice

Competition, once an infrequent and timid visitor, is making a loud return, says Adam Thomson

Politics: Reform on hold as all eyes turn to elections

The PRI is tipped to regain the presidency but it is not all plain sailing, writes Adam Thomson

Industry: Aerospace sector helps high-tech economy fly

Advanced manufacturing skills are boosting exports, writes Adam Thomson

US relationship: Bumps on road to better links

Differences persist on guns, drugs and illegal migrants, says Anna Fifield

Still everything to play for in face-off with BrazilJohn Authers considers the nation’s rivalry with Brazil and asks whether there is all still to play

Stock market: Changes give vigour to once-somnolent bourse

Technical and other alterations facilitate business, reports Adam Thomson

Tourism: Aggressive push to promote country’s multifaceted allure

The nation’s tourism industry is working hard to persuade visitors there is more to discover, writes Adam Thomson

Mexico City: Conditions improve for business

A string of liberal social reforms during the past few years has led some observers to rename Mexico’s capital ‘Marcelona’, writes Adam Thomson

FT Special Report, 13.07.2011

Filed under: BMV - Mexico, Brazil, Library, Mexico, News, Risk Management, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,